Are You Having Too Many Eggs Per Week And Damaging Your Health In The Process?

Medical organizations suggest having a maximum of 7 eggs per week should be safe for the average, healthy person and not elevate cholesterol levels to a dangerous point.

I bring this up because I have seen commercials and online ads for restaurants, which feature two eggs on one breakfast plate (often two fried eggs or a pile of scrambled eggs).

It is common place on diner food menus. However, it is not a healthy practice, particularly if it is repeated each day as a menu choice, by the same people. That’s one person potentially consuming 14 eggs for the week, which is unhealthy for the heart.

Some members of the public repeat this practice at home, as a part of a “hearty” albeit cholesterol laden breakfast, under the guise it is the most important meal of the deal. However, having too much food in one meal, particularly those full of cholesterol, is not good for the heart and arteries.

Restaurants need to stop serving two eggs in one breakfast meal. It is made worse if the individual has pancakes or French toast, which also contains a certain amount of eggs, albeit a smaller amount in the batter. For the sake of heart health, it is best to serve one egg per breakfast plate.

Many athletes also consume well over the recommended amount of eggs per week, using it as a source of protein. This is not heart healthy. It is compounded by the fact athletes do rigorous workouts that are taxing for the heart. Athletes need to revise their egg consumption as well and bring it in line within medical guidelines.

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Eggs: Are they good or bad for my cholesterol?

Most healthy people can eat up to seven eggs a week with no increase in their risk of heart disease. Some studies have shown that this level of egg consumption may actually prevent some types of strokes.

But the story is different for people who have diabetes. In this ever-growing population, eating seven eggs a week significantly increases the risk of heart disease.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one large egg has about 186 mg milligrams (mg) of cholesterol — all of which is found in the yolk.

When deciding whether to include eggs in your diet, consider the recommended daily limits on cholesterol in your food:

  • If you are healthy, consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day.
  • If you have diabetes, high cholesterol or heart disease, limit the daily cholesterol intake to no more than 200 mg a day.

If you like eggs but don’t want the extra cholesterol, use only the egg whites. Egg whites contain no cholesterol. You may also use cholesterol-free egg substitutes, which are made with egg whites.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/expert-answers/cholesterol/faq-20058468