Follow Up: Public Transportation Seating Should Be Made Of Easy To Clean Plastics To Limit Germs And Infections

This is a follow-up to the April 2, 2017 article “Public Transportation Seating Should Be Made Of Easy To Clean Plastics To Limit Germs And Infections.”

On May 16, 2017 it was reported in the mainstream press, “Nine of the world’s most dangerous superbugs found on the tube.” The tubes are the British subway trains. Researchers found, “More than 120 different types of mould and bacteria growing on the seats and handrails” (see mainstream news article excerpt below).

As proposed in the aforementioned April 2, 2017 article, public transport worldwide would be easier to clean and on a regular basis, making it far healthier to travel, if fabric seating was replaced by plastic.

RELATED READING

Nine of the world’s most dangerous superbugs found on the tube 

16 May 2017 at 5:49pm –  Potentially deadly bugs have been found on the tube network  The research was commissioned by insurance company Staveley Head, and carried out by scientists at London Metropolitan University.

They took four swabs on each of the different tube lines, and found more than 120 different types of mould and bacteria growing on the seats and handrails.

Of the bacteria they found, nine were antibiotic resistant bugs that the World Health Organisation had issued a warning about, including the potentially deadly Klebsiella Pneumoniae. The bug doesn’t usually cause problems among healthy people, but can be very dangerous for sick people and those with weakened immune systems.

Usual health advice including washing your hands, keeping any wounds clean and avoiding touching your face or eyes with dirty hands should help to prevent any infections…

http://www.itv.com/news/london/2017-05-16/nine-of-the-worlds-most-dangerous-superbugs-found-on-the-tube

Public Transportation Seating Should Be Made Of Easy To Clean Plastics To Limit Germs And Infections

Modes of public transportation such as trains, buses and taxis harbor germs. The problem is multiplied by the types of seat covering in use in trains, buses and taxis, namely fabric. This is a worldwide problem, not specific to any one nation, but all countries with the aforementioned modes of travel.

The use of fabric seating on public transport can harbor bodily sweat, urine, trace amounts of feces, vomit, sperm and vaginal secretions.

Another issue of public health concern regarding fabric seating on transport is infectious, easily spread mites such as scabies. Bed bugs can also burrow into the fabric via small breaks in the material.

There is also residue from spilled drinks and food present in the fabric.

Due to the difficulty of cleaning/washing seating fabric and in such large quantity in public transportation settings, they are only cleaned annually.

It is best to use plastic materials for seating on pubic transportation, as they can be thoroughly cleaned more frequently, for the sake of public health and do not harbor insects in the manner fabric can.